• The advanced metering network the PUD plans to use will have multiple layers of protection, similar to security used with online banking and ATM machines. Personal identifying information (such as name, address, or account number) is not stored in the meter, nor is it sent through the wireless network. Only the meter’s serial number and the usage data will be collected and transmitted. All transmitted information will be secure and protected through encryption within the network.
  • Honeywell takes a comprehensive approach to security to provide confidentiality, integrity, availability, and auditability within the utility’s network. EnergyAxis features a robust, end-to-end security solution that provides protection against all types of security breaches and attacks. This multi-pronged approach includes these features:
    • Access – Users receive their access privileges based upon their functional roles. The system also supports both media access control (MAC) and Internet Protocol (IP)-address access control lists. Only users with certain levels of authority can perform specific tasks.
    • Authentication – Authentication limits transmissions on the network to authorized devices and personnel only. Sophisticated authentication techniques are used and these techniques are enhanced by utilizing unique keys for each device.
    • Encryption – Encryption prevents unauthorized parties from reading data. National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST)-approved encryption modes and algorithms are used.
    • Monitoring and Reporting – The utility receives notification in the case of a security breach. Security audit logging and reporting allow early detection of any security issues. The Honeywell solution also enables the integration of third-party Intrusion Detection and Prevention systems.
  • The encryption keys are automatically changed on a periodic basis in keeping with industry best-practice security standards.
  • There are 5 steps to enable a meter to work in the field. Keys are never transmitted over the communication network and seeds are never transmitted in the clear.
    • Manufacturing – Every device will have a network interface card (NIC). At manufacturing every NIC will in turn have its’ own unique encrypted identity.
    • Utility HQ – Remote – A manifest with encrypted initialization keys is sent to Utility.
    • Connexo NetSense – The Connexo NetSense Head-End is setup and keys are stored in system.
    • Connexo FieldSense – On Site – Utility Field serviceman will replace old meter with new Honeywell meter and will use handheld to scan barcode on the meter to designate and confirm field installation and syncing installation status. At this point, keys remain encrypted.
    • Utility HQ-Remote – NetSense will validate that NIC is trusted to operate on this system.
  • Routers do not accept LAN commands via the EnergyAxis 900-MHz radio that requests it to initiate LAN activity. This design feature denies an adversary any possibility of using a 900-MHz radio to control the Router’s activities or gaining access.
  • Honeywell views cybersecurity as a never-ending pursuit to thwart an unremitting threat and they are committed to the continuous improvement of their security systems. The Honeywell AMI system design meticulously constructs and implements the system with security in mind. Their system is intrinsically secure. It is not bolted-together-parts secure.

 

Honeywell Graphic stating security measures and steps.